Please Give Me Characters I Can Believe


I am willing to invite into my Kindle or bookshelf fictional characters I would not invite to dine at my table. I don’t have to like them to read their stories to the end. But I do have to believe they are authentic in order to give them a place in my life and time. I downloaded Tears at Night (Book 1, Praise Him Anyhow) by Vanessa Miller as a free book on my Kindle a few days ago. When I got around to reading it, I simply couldn’t believe the characters.

Carmella Marshall has been married to Nelson, a prominent judge, for over twenty years. After they married, she put him through law school and then he wanted her to be a stay-at-home mom to their two children, Joy and Dontae, after they were born. He also expected her to be the perfect hostess for his fundraising events in their home. She gained a reputation for her cooking and baking. Nothing unbelievable about that so far.

As the book opens, Carmella is taking Nelson’s favorite sweet potato souffle out of the oven when Nelson says, ‘I’m leaving you.’ Carmella had her Christian praise music on so loud she hadn’t heard him. So he repeats his statement. She thinks he’s just leaving on a business trip, but he clears up that misconception by telling her he’s leaving for good, wants a divorce, and will leave papers on the table for her to sign in a couple of days. She says she won’t sign them.

Up until this time Carmella has assumed they were a happy Christian couple. Their son, Dontae, a senior, is away at football camp. He expects to be admitted to Harvard, his father’s alma mater, the next year. Their daughter Joy, who is in law school, works in Nelson’s law office. When Carmella asks what she should tell the children about Nelson’s wanting a divorce, he says the children are old enough to handle it.

It doesn’t work out that way. Joy and Jasmine are roommates and when we meet Joy, she is helping Jasmine move to a new house where she will live with her mystery man whom she has been seeing somewhat secretly for some time. They are relaxing in the large and elegant home waiting for Jasmine’s new boyfriend to arrive so Joy can finally meet him. Joy has long suspected this man was married, since he never picked up Jasmine for dates and the two were sneaking around. Joy couldn’t condone this behavior because she grew up with Christian parents who had gone to church every Sunday. Her father had run for judge on a platform of the family values he had tried to instill in his children. But Joy and Jasmine had been roommates since college, now attended law school, and both worked in Judge Nelson Marshall’s law office. They were planning to open their own law firm when they graduated. For the sake of their friendship, Joy had gone ahead and helped Joy move her things, teasing her that her boyfriend should have helped with the heavy lifting. Joy herself is engaged to Troy, someone honorable — like her father.

The girls have had pizza delivered and are sitting around eating it and recovering from unloading the moving truck. Jasmine went into the kitchen to get some drinks when the doorbell rang again. So Joy answered the door, and I probably don’t need to tell you that she opened it to see her father. Since Joy hasn’t heard about his leaving her mother yet, she assumes he’s heard where she was and was intending to pick her up and take her home. Joy figures things out quickly when Jasmine comes out of the kitchen and gives Nelson a big kiss. Joy prepares to leave as Jasmine gloats. Nelson says to Jasmine, ‘This isn’t how I wanted to tell her….You had no right bringing Joy here without letting me know.’

Joy is confused and no longer trusts men. She breaks her engagement because she thought her father was honorable and he turned out not to be, so she’s now not sure if Troy is as honorable as she always thought. Poor Troy doesn’t understand why Joy suddenly thinks he’s going to cheat on her after he’s always treated her well.

Meanwhile. Carmella is trying to adjust. She really has convinced herself that Nelson is just going through midlife crisis and will be back after a few more months. So she’s back in the kitchen, listening to her praise music when Joy enters and asks why no one told her about her dad leaving? Joy tells her mother about her father and Jasmine living together and her mother won’t believe it at first. When she finally does, she begins laughing hysterically and can’t stop.

Joy calls Rose, her mother’s best friend to come and offer support. They discuss a few emotionally charged options like baking Nelson and Jasmine a cake full of poo, but Carmella doesn’t want to ruin one of her beautiful cakes. When Rose encourages her to fight, Carmella admits she doesn’t know how. She tells Rose, ‘All I’ve ever done is be Nelson’s obedient pup, run his errands, and take care of his house. I haven’t even put the degree I worked so hard to get to use in over twenty years.’ Then she started to cry “like tears were rain and she was doing her part to end an all-consuming drought. ”

Carmella retires to her bedroom and Joy brings her something to eat, even though Carmella has no appetite. Carmella is awakened in the morning by a call from the bank saying the mortgage payment hadn’t been made. Later there was a call that the payment on her car hadn’t been made. She called Nelson at the office and screamed at him about the bills. She expresses anger when Nelson tells her, ‘No one is belittling what you did for our family. But don’t you think it’s time for you to get a job and handle your own bills?’

She replies he’s the one who left after she had put him through law school and then taken care of his house, raised their children and entertained his business associates for over twenty years. It was his idea that she not have a career outside the home. If he wants to “live a double life he’d better find the money to pay for it.” He tells her to sign the divorce papers and he’ll give her a ‘decent settlement.’

She hangs up in fury and is about to throw the phone against the wall when Joy appears with Dontae, whom she just picked up at the airport. He has no idea what is going on. Joy takes him into another room and explains everything. He says he’s going to see their father and takes off in his Mustang. Carmella takes to her bed and Joy begins to question he direction of her own life. She has already broken the relationships with both Jasmine and her father. She also decides to quit law school, and to resign from her job in her father’s office.

About this time Troy calls to find out why he hasn’t heard from her in a couple of days. She projects her anger and disillusionment with her father onto Troy rather unfairly and insinuates he can’t be trusted either. After she hangs up, she’s about to return to her apartment when the phone rings again. Dontae is calling to say he’s in jail for vandalizing his father and Jasmine’s house by throwing rocks through their window. Jasmine had called the police. Nobody in the family has enough money on hand to bail him out except Nelson, and he won’t, since he wants Dontae to learn that actions have consequences. Carmella and Joy find this statement ironic, in light of Nelson’s own actions. Carmella finally gets an advance on her credit card to go bail Dontae out.

Joy finds out about the unpaid mortgage and car payment. Dontae says he no longer wants to go to Harvard, his dad’s alma mater. Carmella goes to the kitchen to fix dinner and discovers the faucet is still leaking after she had asked Nelson several times to fix it. She loses it. She grabs a pair of pliers and her car keys and tells Joy she’s going to get Nelson. Joy isn’t able to stop her and Carmella says,’Girl, get out of my way.’ Carmella’s eyes are wild as she plows her way out the door, ready to go confront Nelson.

It doesn’t go well. She gets to the house, rings the bell, and sees someone peek through the blinds. No one answers the door. She starts screaming that she wants her husband to come out, to no avail. So she starts shouting in the direction of the neighbors’ houses, screaming ‘That’s right everybody. You’ve got an adultery-committing judge and his slimy teen-aged slut living in this house right here.’ She pointed to their house. She airs all their dirty laundry about how Jasmine had stolen her husband and warns the other women to keep an eye on their own husbands.

That brought Nelson out. They had quite a shouting match, much enjoyed by the neighbors. He finally asks what she wants and she hands him the pliers and almost begs him to come home and fix the faucet. Jasmine insults her, and Carmella attacks Jasmine. They get into a physical fight and the neighbors egg them on. Nelson can’t separate them so he finally turns on the sprinkler. Jasmine was then able to escape, but Carmella kept pounding the ground. Finally someone called the police and they restrained her.

By this time is was evident to all that Carmella has had a breakdown. We see her laughing hysterically and the author says…”her mind had taken her to a happy place…a place of peace. A place where she, Nelson and the kids frolicked on the sandy beach and Jasmine was nowhere in sight.’ At this point in the book, I hit the list of other books by the author that normally comes at the end of the book. My first thought was that was a very strange ending. Then I noticed that on the bottom it said I was only 26% through the book, but I couldn’t get any farther in it. I got offers to put other books on my wish list, etc., but no more pages for this story. I finally called Amazon and three tech support calls later I was able to access the rest of the book in a very roundabout way. By the time I got there, I thought I might be reading a different book. 

I would suggest that if you want to read this book, you get it in paper because one other review I read of the Kindle edition indicated the same problem in downloading a complete book. I thought Carmella would wind up in jail, but they had taken her to the hospital and sedated her, instead. Rose and the children sat with her for two days until she woke up.

She decided then to trust God and praise him and see how he would handle her life. She found a good lawyer to help her get a decent divorce settlement. She got the idea of starting a baking business. She rediscovers the man she almost married whose wife has just died and they go out to dinner. She is once again on the road to being able to handle her life. To me the characters weren’t true to life.

I personally have never known people who acted this way in these situations. I had two neighbors whose husbands left them the same week. I had many conversations with both of them. One simply couldn’t handle it and she killed herself a few months later. The other one walked with me almost every day and her teen children had a very tough time adjusting. Her thirteen year old daughter eventually left school, shacked up with someone, and got pregnant. Then she got a job as a manager of a fast food restaurant. The son, who was older, was still very upset with his dad, but showed maturity in finishing school and going into a successful career in real estate. The jilted wife went back to school so she could take up her nursing career again. She eventually found a new boyfriend. All this took years. Neither woman made a public scene anywhere. They played the hand they were dealt, each in her own way. Both were believable.

If the one had suddenly started handling her life like a new person after listening to a few praise songs on the radio following her release from the hospital after her first suicide attempt, it would not have been believable. Neither was Carmello’s transformation when she was released realistic. The kind of healing she experienced just doesn’t happen that fast. I’m not saying it’s impossible, but it’s highly improbable. As a Christian who has seen many Christian women struggle in their marriages and seen their responses when their husbands left them, I have never seen any reaction similar to Carmella’s. I have seen shock or surprise when the men left the women who did not suspect their marriage was in trouble. These women have shared their feelings with me. Their faith did help them through their sadness when their marriages fell apart and their husbands moved in with other women.

It seems to me Carmella was in denial when she put the praise album on after Nelson first left. She believed he would come back. She wasn’t believing God was still there for her even if Nelson was gone for good. When she learned Nelson really was leaving to live with a woman she had always trusted in her home, she suddenly had a complete breakdown. She went from denial to complete breakdown in a short time, with seemingly no in between.

I think it was the extremes that seemed most unrealistic to me and made this book unbelievable. Joy’s sudden projection of her feelings about her father onto Troy was irrational. I can see where she might have had doubts and wanted to explore them, but she went way beyond that. The author has little to write that is good about Nelson, though he states he wants his children to be happy. He has an unrealistic view of what a marriage break-up can do to even adult children, even though he is a judge. Both Carmella and Nelson seem like cardboard characters, not real people. It seems the characters are there to fit the plot rather than the plot evolving from actions consistent with well-developed characters. I suppose that’s why I didn’t see any growth in the characters. I only saw things happen in the plot.

The end of the book seemed quite unrealistic considering what the characters had been through. I didn’t see anyone genuinely walking by faith in what I suppose was intended to be a Christian novel. Faith acts, not just reacts. Faith is not determined by circumstances. It transforms our view of our circumstances, helping us see God in the midst of the bad things that happen.

The theme of this book — handling adversity through God’s strength, had great potential. In my opinion, the author took shortcuts that did not do justice to that theme. In my opinion, we are still left hanging at the end. All the good things fall into place for Carmella unrealistically and far too quickly to be believable. Yes, God answers our prayers, but these answers didn’t seem consistent with God’s usual way of working.

Many who reviewed this book on the Amazon site loved it and found it inspiring.  Maybe I’m the one who just can’t buy into the plot. You may want to read this for yourself to make up your own mind. It’s on a list of best-selling Christian fiction. Maybe I’m just not tuned into the same wavelength as others, but I will not be reading any more in this series, even though I’m a bit curious to see if Carmella will finally marry her rediscovered first love.

Earlene Fowler’s Benni Harper in State Fair

The Benni Harper Mystery Series is Set in San Luis Obispo County

I first became interested in the  Earlene Fowler’s  Benni Harper mysteries when I heard they were set in my county, San Luis Obispo County, in California. The first one I got my hands on was Goose in the Pond (Benni Harper Mystery).  Like most books in this series, it was  set in San Celina. Benni’s official job is director of the Josiah Sinclair Folk Art Museum. The museum ties in with the quilt theme reflected on the covers and in the titles of the Benni Harper books, and quilts and quilters play a significant role in these mysteries.

Earlene Fowler's Benni Harper in State Fair
Laguna Lake, San Luis Obispo

 

Which Places are Fictional and Which are Real in Fowler’s Benni Harper Mystery Books?

Fowler has changed the name of the city of San Luis Obispo to San Celina, but she refers to other cities in the county, such as Paso Robles, by their real names. I gave my brain a workout trying to figure out what library she was talking about that was near a lake in Goose in the Pond. I know where the library in San Luis Obispo is, and there is no lake nearby.

I finally found Fowler’s  Fool’s Puzzle Tour, where she does explain that her library building was based on the Huntington Beach Library where she had worked,  and in The Goose in the Pond she put it near Laguna Lake in San Luis Obispo.  I walked around that lake a couple of months ago and took the photo which appears above.

The people and businesses Earlene Fowler writes about are mostly fictional, but it’s fun trying to see if they are based on actual places. On the website linked to above and on her Irish Chain tour, she tells us which places are real and which buildings and locations inspired her descriptions of them.

Who’s Who in the Benni Harper Series

After reading The Goose in the Pond, I realized the Benni Harper mysteries were best read in order, so I went back to the first one, Fool’s Puzzle (Benni Harper Mystery), and started reading. In this first book Benni is a recent widow making a fresh start in San Celina. She had lived on a ranch with her husband Jack before he died. She had lived on her parent’s ranch since she was a child.

Her Grandma Dove still lived on the ranch owned by Benni’s father. Dove had moved there to help raise Benni after Benni’s mother had died . When we meet Benni, she is working in the city as the director of the Josiah Sinclair Folk Art Museum .  When she discovers a dead body in the course of her work, she plays sleuth, causing a run-in with the San Celina police chief, Gabe Ortiz. Their relationship remains antagonistic through most of the book.


By the time we progress in the series to State Fair , Gabe and Benni are married. They have had their share of problems and worked have them through.  Those who have read all the way through the series have also met the other main characters.

  • Dove, Benni’s grandma who raised her
  • Hud, a deputy sheriff who raises Gabe’s hackles by paying too much attention to Benni
  • Elvia, Benni’s best friend who owns Blind Harry’s bookstore
  • Benni’s cousin Emory, who is married to Elvia
  • Their infant daughter, Sophia
  • Garnet, Dove’s sister, who is visiting from Arkansas

Conflicts in Earlene Fowler’s State Fair

Since Benni has been raised on a ranch and still is active in ranching activities at her father’s ranch, she has been involved in the Mid-State Fair in Paso Robles since childhood.  She is also very busy at this year’s fair judging pig-wrangling, making sure things go right at the folk art museum’s exhibit of African-American folk quilts, and keeping her great aunt Garner, out of Dove’s hair. The two sisters wage constant battle with each other, so Benni agreed (under duress) to take her off Dove’s hands for many of the fair days.

Themes running through this book include racism, the conflict between Dove and Garnet, and local crime. There’s still a hint of conflict between Hud, who is responsible as part of the sheriff’s department for fair security, and Gabe, who attends fair events but has no jurisdiction over criminal events in Paso Robles.  There is also rivalry between the sheriff’s department and the Paso Robles Police.

Racism  Rears Its Head as the Fair Begins

In the book, a new fair director, Levi Clark, an African-American, has been appointed. Not everyone is happy about it, and there are rumors that he was an affirmative action appointee who might not be the best person for the job.  Benni considered him very qualified and had known him since he began at the fair cleaning restrooms years earlier, and she had watched as he had worked his way up to fair manager.

Early in the fair, Benni learned Levi had received some letters insinuating he hadn’t received his job fairly and that he might have bitten off more than he could chew, and that he might be sorry. These had been reported to the Paso Robles Police Department, but not to the sheriff’s department. It’s evident when Hud learns this he is upset he wasn’t notified, since his department has jurisdiction over the fair.

Fair Food and the New Hospitality Center

Benni loves the fair atmosphere and its tempting fair-only deep fried avocados, deep-fried Twinkies, and other fattening treats . For her it’s like an annual reunion of the agriculture people she has interacted with for years. She likes to hang out at the Hospitality Center,  informally known as the Bull Pen, with other fair Booster Buddies.

Earlene Fowler's Benni Harper in State Fair
Scene from Mid State Fair, 2005, CC 2.0

Her cousin Emory had made a big contribution toward remodeling the hospitality suite for this year’s fair to make it more comfortable for Booster Buddies and their friends to gather there for drinks, snacks, and making deals .  Most of the movers and shakers in the county’s  agriculture and business community had paid the $500 annual fee to become members and also worked hard to promote the fair. That’s one reason so many important conversations take place there during the course of the book.

A Stolen Quilt

The Josiah Sinclair Folk Art Museum booth is featuring a collection of African-American quilts made by the Ebony Sisters Quilt Guild.  The focal point of the exhibit was to be a special replica of a historical story quilt made by renowned historic quilter Harriet Powers.

On opening day, the Ebony Sisters report that the quilt has been stolen. They find another quilt to hang in it’s place, hoping the theft is just a prank and that the quilt will be found and rehung. 

The Family Farm Exhibits

One of Benni’s favorite exhibit areas is that where the family farms have their displays. She knows the families. Traditionally each farm family was given an exhibit space to decorate according to the year’s theme.  Usually the children were involved in the decorating.

Benni  is disappointed that this event has become more competitive and that the adults have almost taken over the decorating so as to make their displays more professional looking.  The winning family usually had its display featured on the front page of the Tribune. This year’s theme was “Cow Town Boogie.”

Benni walks around the family farm exhibits taking photos. The Blue Ribbon Grand Prize winner had not exactly followed the theme, but Benni could see why it had won. She was a bit upset that it appeared the booth had been designed and built by professionals, not by Milt Piebald’s family.

Although the Piebald family lived on a large ranch and had some livestock, Milt made his living by selling cars in his five used car dealerships spread throughout the county.  Everyone knew how much he liked to win. Although he was not considered a really reputable dealer, he did give generously to the community.

The Cattle Drive Through Paso Robles

Gabe, Benni, and her dad participated in the annual cattle drive through the streets of Paso Robles. I had fun deciphering the names of the streets the cattle ran through to get to the fairgrounds,  but Fowler’s code was easy to  break for this local. The cattle drive went smoothly almost to the end, when a horse got loose and caused a bit of excitement.  Due to Gabe’s quick action, the situation was soon back under control.

The Dead Body

Back at the fair, Dove corners Benni and says she’s got to help her. Garnet is driving her crazy.  Benni agrees to entertain her aunt for the rest of the day. She first takes Garnet to see the family farm exhibit.

It is Aunt Garnet who comments, upon seeing the Piebald exhibit, ‘Look at that old pickup truck….Daddy used to call them pick-me-up trucks….He had one just like that, only it was dark blue. I remember many times taking cold lemonade out to him when he was working on that truck. Just like that there dummy. Seeing those legs sticking out like that brings Daddy back like it was yesterday.’

Benni turned back to look at the exhibit again to study the truck. She saw the legs Garnet had commented on, and she realized they had not been there earlier. She sat Garnet down and dialed Hud after taking a closer look and confirming that the legs were human and dead. It turns out the body is wrapped in the missing quilt.

Garnet Plays Detective

From then on Garnet is determined to play detective and find out who the killer is — a role Benni herself usually takes.  This obsession gives Garnet an interest other than fighting with Dove, who is sure Garnet wants to find and steal her famous cornbread recipe. Garnet’s efforts to play detective almost get Benni and her family and friends killed, although Benni herself did her part in stirring up the skinheads who threatened them.

A subplot involves the reason for Garnet’s visit  and why she won’t reveal how long she plans to stay. Everyone senses this is no ordinary visit, but the sisters refuse to communicate in a straightforward manner. They just don’t get around to talking about why Garnet is really there.  It finally comes out near the end of the book, after the other mysteries have been solved.

Why I Enjoyed the Book

Fowler handles both plot and characters deftly. I find it hard to put her books down, and I always look forward to the next one.  The subplots are woven artistically into the main plot. I didn’t even mention most of the subplots in State Fair here , nor many of the minor characters who  played important roles in those subplots.

Part of the fun in this series is watching what happens in the lives of the main characters from book to book. You get to know each one very well. They  have their quirks, but are still  lovable. The characters are so well-developed that you would be able to identify them just by what they say to each other.  They grow on you.

I can visualize having a party and inviting all of them for an fascinating evening.  They will not be sneaking into the bedrooms or using foul language. Instead they will be entertaining guests who will interact with each other in a lively manner.

Who Should Read This Book

If you enjoy well-written mysteries with a memorable cast of characters, you will want to read the Benni Harper Series by Earlene Fowler. If you live in San Luis Obispo County, the books will be even more appealing.  They will not only make you laugh, they will make you think. You can find all Earlene Fowler’s books here on Amazon.

 Benni Harper’s Quilt Album: A Scrapbook of Quilt Projects, Photos & Never-Before-Told Stories

 

 

Here’s a sampling of Earlene Fowler’s Benni Harper Books. Benni Harper fans might also be interested in Benni  Harper’s Quilt Album.

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 Fool’s Puzzle (Benni Harper Mystery) Irish Chain (Benni Harper Mystery) Kansas Troubles (Benni Harper Mystery)

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What You Can Expect on the Menu at Bookworm Buffet

Child Reading book in Swing
I have always loved books. This was taken outside sitting in Cousin Edna’s swing when I was about two.

I have loved books for as long as I can remember. I not only had parents who read to me, but there were two single teachers in our extended family who were nearing retirement when I was growing up. Cousin Edna, my first cousin three times removed,  treated me like a grandchild, since she had no children. Her roommate, whom we called Auntie Lucile, taught science, and treated me like a niece. They both liked to read to me on our Sunday visits, and they made sure I was always supplied with books.

They knew me well, and always chose books I enjoyed. I’m glad that there were no media inspired series of books being published when I was a child in the 1940’s. Instead I got imaginative stories that my family read to me — until it appeared I was getting ready to learn to read for myself. The only series I read a lot of when I was approaching school age was the Little Golden Books Series. If I had to choose a favorite from it, it would be The Poky Little Puppy
I think most children can identify with this curious little puppy who is interested in everything he sees and hears, and always stops to investigate, even though it makes him late for dinner.

Some of my favorite books when I was young.
Some of my favorite books when I was young.
Amanda p.18 illustration, @ Wolo
Amanda p.18 illustration, @ Wolo, 1941, William Morrow and Co. Amanda makes a slide of her body to give the winged monkeys such a good time they will tell her how to get to the Blue Lake. Archibald, the monkey hitting the water, is Amanda’s best friend.

The books in this photo came from my Cousin Edna, I absolutely loved Amanda, the story of a kind snake. She had polka dots, wore a ribbon in her hair and a necklace, and on  the tip of her tail was a golden bell.  Amanda was helpful to everyone. I can still visualize the illustrations by Wolo (Wolf Von Trutzschlerafter 67 years. This featured illustration was scanned from my well worn first edition that had been read countless times.

Amanda goes in and out of print. See which Amanda editions are available now at Amazon.  As I searched for them, I discovered Wolo also had a series of animal stories I had never known about before I did my search. I’m sorry I missed them.

For me, Mother Goose will always mean the verses I saw in the the collection pictured above, collected, arranged, and illustrated by William Rose Benét,  whose illustrations now seem overly bright and somewhat gaudy to me. Some used and collectible copies can be found on Amazon, if you like the style or remember it from your own childhood. Children’s book illustrations have some a long way since the 1940’s. Some verses are timeless, though, even though some writers have tried to revise them to be more politically correct or to teach a particular religious view.

The third book, The Adventures of Old Mr. Toad, is one of a set of six I received for Christmas when I was six years old. It was another present from Cousin Edna. It not only taught me that toads have beautiful eyes, but the author, Thornton Burgess, also opened a whole new world of nature and wisdom to me. His animal characters wear human clothes and have human personality traits , but they also have the habits and characteristics of the wild animals that they are.

Burgess weaves these together to draw young readers into the world of the Green Forest and the animals and birds found there. Children can taste the fear of Chatterer the Red Squirrel as he runs from Shadow the Weasel and they will root for him as he devises his escape plan to make Shadow the hunted rather than the hunter. Chatterer was the first Burgess character I met, but I’ve never forgotten him. I devoured that first book and had all six read before New Year’s Day. I eagerly looked forward to each new book in the series. These books helped me learn to love wildlife.

I didn’t mind the morals in the short verses Burgess included. He was trying to help young readers realize there are consequences to teasing, stealing from others, and other undesirable behaviors . Here’s an example of his mild moralizing in prose as part of the story:

If he (Chatterer) hadn’t called Bobby Coon names that morning at the top of his voice, Shadow the Weasel might not have found him. 

My favorite books as they appear in the photo aren’t easy to find today. I have given you links above for my Amanda and Mother Goose books if they interest you. The illustrations, along with which verses have been selected,  probably will determine which edition of Mother Goose your young bookworms will want to devour, and tastes vary. You can choose the Mother Goose edition you like best on Amazon by looking inside the books.

Thornton Burgess books are much easier to find, since there are inexpensive paperback versions still in print, collections of the books in slipcases, and story collections in single volumes. As I write this, Kindle editions of most of the original Burgess stories I mentioned here can be downloaded for free. I just think most young bookworms would prefer the paper editions or hardcover illustrated collections, such as this one: Burgess’ Bedtime Story-Books, Vol. 3: The Adventures of Chatterer the Red Squirrel, Sammy Jay, Buster Bear, and Old Mr. Toad. It contains my four favorites in the series.

I read so many books as a child that I’ve forgotten most of them. A few do stand out and are still much loved by today’s children. I will be introducing more of my favorites, including those still in print, as I have time, and they won’t be limited to children’s books. Soon I truly will have a buffet for bookworms laid out that will please the diverse fiction and nonfiction tastes of all readers, young and old.