Category Archives: Abuse in Fiction

The Surrogate by Patricia Bell: The Unintended Consequences

Why Would One Become a Surrogate Mother?

Why does a person decide to become a surrogate mother? What makes a woman want to carry a child that belongs to someone else? To help a barren friend become a mother? Or as a way to earn money to start a new life?

Book Review of The Surrogate by Patricia Bell: A Tale of Unintended Consequences

When young Emily’s employer, Mrs. Stevenson, offers to pay her $100,000 to become her surrogate, Emily jumps at the chance. The cash would help her realize  her dream of starting her own cafe.

She didn’t really like working for the Stevensons. She knew Mrs. Stevenson was cruel and manipulative. Emily had seen her falsely accuse and fire good employees who had done nothing wrong.  She tried not to get on Judy Stevenson’s bad side, because she couldn’t afford to lose her job as housekeeper and cook for the rich couple. They even provided her with living quarters and she had nowhere else to go.

The Offer

Emily discusses the Stevensons’ offer for her to become Judy’s surrogate with her best friend and fellow employee Brandon. He doesn’t understand how one becomes a surrogate.  First she explains how the egg is implanted into her womb, adding that the doctor will explain more details after she signs a contract with Mr. Stevenson’s lawyer.

Brandon: …If you go through with this implant, they’ll hand you a hundred thousand dollars?….Just like that?

Emily: As soon as the baby is born, they’ll give me the money….They have a contract and everything….Don’t you see? I can leave here and find a place of my own. This is my only way out. A new start.

As Emily tries to convince herself it’s the right thing to do, it seems simple. She gets the implant, carries the baby to term, gives birth, and collects her $100,000. Brandon urges her to think it over for a couple of days before signing anything. He warns her that she could form a bond with  the baby and not want to give it up. She dismisses the idea. She knows she’s not old enough at nineteen to raise a baby.

Into this discussion walks Mrs. Stevenson herself, but they hadn’t noticed at first that she was listening.  She tells Brandon to get back to his gardening duties. As he’s leaving, this scene unfolds. Here’s how Emily tells it:

‘Oh, and Brandon, ‘ Mrs Stevenson pauses, awaiting his full attention. He turns and glares at her in complete defiance. A look I’ve never seen from him before. If you’ve ever heard the saying tension so thick you could cut it, then you understand my current situation. ‘I don’t pay you to give advice. If you would like to stay employed in this household, I suggest you mind your own business.’

‘But he was—‘ I start, but she silences me with a mere glance. She’s the type of woman who can smile at you and stare daggers into your soul at the same time. Something about her gives me the chills. 


 

Brandon Disappears

After Brandon leaves, Emily regrets ever telling him about the offer and her intention, thus provoking the confrontation. She is very fond of Brandon and is drawn to him. He has always been caring and gentle with her, unlike the many men her mother had brought home when she was growing up.

Her mother had kicked her out of the house the day she turned eighteen.  She had worked at a diner until Mrs. Sevenson employed her and gave her a place to live.

Emily recognizes she’s attracted to Brandon, but is afraid he just sees her as a friend. He has been sharing his Christian faith with her.

Now Mrs. Stevenson approaches her, asking if she’s having second thoughts. She also tells Emily that if she decides not to become the surrogate, they will no longer have a place for her to stay. It will go to the person who does become a surrogate.  Emily assures Mrs. Stevenson she will go through with the plan.

That night Brandon turns up in her living quarters unexpectedly and they continue the conversation. When Brandon leaves, the two are still at odds. Emily knows Brandon disapproves of her decision, but she hasn’t changed her mind.

Emily is anxious to talk to Brandon again, but try as she might she can’t find him anywhere on the grounds. At first she assumes he’s mad at her. She later discovers he’s been fired. She feels terrible. And she misses him.

Book Review of The Surrogate by Patricia Bell: A Tale of Unintended Consequences

Red Flags Emily Tried Not to Notice Before Signing the Surrogate Contract

  • Brandon’s questions
  • Mr. Stevenson’s admonition to think about it at least overnight and his seeming discomfort over the transaction.
  • The provision in the contract that the money will be paid when she delivers a healthy baby
  • The lawyer’s statement that the contract is unconventional and that such transactions are normally done through an agency
  • Mr. Stevenson’s haunted look while urging Emily to think carefully before signing
  • The behavior of the doctor leading Emily to believe Mrs. Stevenson has had other surrogates
  • The words of Nurse O’Neill while giving Emily her medications, and the words the nurse mutters that she thinks Emily can’t hear, as well as the stories she tells Emily about Mrs. Stevenson’s past.
  • Her own observations of Mrs. Stevenson’s character, manipulative behavior, and selfishness


My Review of The Surrogate

I couldn’t put this book down from the moment I started reading. The main characters were well-developed, though I thought the plot was unrealistic. However I was so interested in what might happen next I was willing to overlook that. I believe the author’s main intent was to show how what seems to be a simple decision can be incredibly complex and even dangerous.

Emily appears to be a new Christian. She is blinded by her desire to escape Mrs. Stevenson’s employment and start her restaurant with the money she will get when the baby is born.  She assumes everything will go as planned. It doesn’t.

After early testing, the doctor tells Mrs. Stevenson that there’s a chance the baby may be born with Down’s Syndrome, and Judy insists on an abortion. By this time Emily is bonding to the baby and she runs away with Brandon’s help to try to save the baby’s life. As it turns out she also needs to save her own. The reader is in suspense until  the end as Emily and Brandon try to escape from Judy’s thugs . The action doesn’t stop.

The story reflects the author’s pro-life position and Christian values. There are plenty of Christian characters besides Brandon whose lives impact Emily’s in a positive way.

The book is suitable for both young adults and their mothers who want to read clean fiction with lots of suspense and a touch of romance.  It delves into the ethical and emotional issues surrounding surrogate motherhood and abortion without being preachy.  I recommend it.


Here are some of the other Christian novels I have reviewed that you may enjoy:

How Sweet the Sound by Amy Sorrells:  The author uses this Christian novel to reveal  the destructive patterns that can lead families and individuals to despair, but she also show us the way to Abba’s love and healing.

Tabitha by Vikki Kestell — A historical novel in which a young lady’s bad decision caused pain from which only the grace of God could deliver her

Inescapable: The Road to Kingdom: Is it possible to escape one’s past by running away? Lizzie Engel, born Amish, tries.

Review of Elderberry Croft Complete Collection

Elderberry Croft: A Place of Refuge for a Hurting Soul

When Willow Goodhope moved into the old cottage in the  Coach House Trailer Park, she named it Elderberry Croft. She had chosen it because she had seen the little elderberry tree growing along the creek near her cottage. It had reminded her of a Bible verse about a tree planted by the water that sent its shoots out and did not need to fear heat or drought. Its leaves would remain green, and it would continue to bear fruit.

Book Review of Elderberry Croft Complete Collection by Becky Doughty
Elderberry Tree in Bloom, © B. Radisavljevic

As Willow told her neighbor Kathy, ‘I’m like that tree. I’m in a place right now where growing seems almost impossible, but God is teaching me to send my roots toward the water,  to choose life, and maybe to bloom where I’m planted, even to bear fruit. For now, this is where I’m planted.’

Find Elderberry Croft Complete Collection on eBay. 

What Is Willow’s Secret Hurt?

As soon as Willow got out of her old Toyota truck and started unpacking,  her nearest neighbors Kathy and Myra started spying on her. They watched as she transformed the old cottage they both knew was a shack into a hanging garden with her potted plants.

Not only Kathy and Myra but also the rest of the Southern California trailer park residents were curious to see what the young redhead would be like. They couldn’t imagine why someone so young would live at their trailer park. Most of the residents were much older. Most believed they and their neighbors had come to the Coach House Trailer Park to remain until they died.  Willow didn’t seem to fit.

Book Review of Elderberry Croft Complete Collection by Becky Doughty
Elderberries

Willow was a mystery, an enigma. She managed to find out her neighbors’ secrets as she helped heal their wounded spirits with her goody baskets and tasty things made of elderberries. She somehow managed to help physically and emotionally isolated residents to form healthy and supportive relationships with other residents they knew only as names.

Find Elderberry Croft Complete Collection on Amazon.

Willow knew everyone’s problems. No one knew Willow’s. Occasionally someone heard her plaintive singing by the creek or saw her tears. Rumors were that she had a husband but was not living with him. No one could pry the reason she was hiding at Elderberry Croft out of Willow until almost the end of the book.

No Spoilers Here

The author gave me a free download for this book with no strings attached. I did not even have to promise to review the book.  I decided to read it when I came home from a trip exhausted and didn’t feel like anything heavy.  It was the perfect book to keep me curious to the end without taxing my brain too much.

I loved getting to know all the residents of the trailer park and I began to care about all of them. Although the plot was light, the residents all dealt with heavy problems. They ranged from substance abuse, childhood abuse, and PTSD to serious relationship problems that tore families apart.

Book Review of Elderberry Croft Complete Collection by Becky Doughty
Willow often reached out to her neighbors with baskets of homemade baked goods.

Until  Willow came and reached out to them with her healing baskets of baked goods, teas, jams, and salves made of herbs and elderberries, the Coach House residents nursed their hurts in isolation. Willow gave to others to keep from facing her deepest hurt. In the end, it’s the hurt of another that forces her to confront her own pain.

I did not want this inspirational novel to end. It appeared that Willow was on the way to healing at the conclusion, but I still bought the sequel because I wanted to know more. I wasn’t ready to say goodbye to Willow yet. If you read Elderberry Croft, you probably won’t want to say goodbye either.

I recommend that you start with the complete collection because once you start reading, you won’t want to stop. The characters’ stories develop together until the end. If you don’t have all the parts, you will be left hanging.

 

Elderberry Croft: The Complete CollectionElderberry Croft: The Complete CollectionElderberry Croft (4 Book Series)Elderberry Croft (4 Book Series)Elderberry Days: Season of Joy: Elderberry Croft Volume 5 - The SequelElderberry Days: Season of Joy: Elderberry Croft Volume 5 – The SequelElderberry Croft: The Complete Collection by Doughty, Becky (December 1, 2013) PaperbackElderberry Croft: The Complete Collection by Doughty, Becky (December 1, 2013) Paperback

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Book Review: A Mother’s Conviction

A Mother’s Conviction

The title  A Mother’s Conviction by Karen Lenfestey probably refers to a mother’s conviction for vehicular homicide after she killed two people while driving drunk.  She had two little girls.

The book deals with the issue of when children in foster care are ready for reunification with their birth parent or parents. Lenfestey accurately portrays the dilemma of foster parents when they fear they will have to hand over children they have come to love to a parent who may abuse or neglect them again. It deals with the question of what’s best for a child. It also deals with parental rights.

Book Review: A Mother's Conviction by Karen Lenfestey

Foster Care: Bethany and Willow

When Bethany Morris saw the return address from the Tennessee Prison for Women on the envelope, her protective instincts immediately kicked in. It had to be from Gola, Willow’s birth mother. Should she open it? Willow, Bethany’s six-year-old foster child, was just beginning to feel safe. Bethany loved Willow as though she were her own.

 A Mother’s Conviction (Secrets Series Book 3)

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A single mother and daughter of a minister, Bethany had become pregnant as a teenager. She had given her baby girl, Hannah, who was now sixteen, up for adoption without consulting her parents. Her father had never let her forget it.  Now Bethany finds it hard to be around him. She does take Willow for visits, though, since Bethany believes the contact with her parents is  good for all of them. (This story of Bethany’s earlier life is told in the first book in this series.)

Bethany’s current boyfriend, Parker, is the father of their child. He had been married but is no longer. He regrets he married the wrong woman, but he has Huntington’s Disease and he doesn’t think it’s fair to marry Bethany just so she can watch him die. As the two talk after Bethany has read Gola’s letter, she reveals that Gola said she will be getting out of prison soon, she is no longer drinking, she has turned her life around. She plans to take Willow and her step-sister Skye home with her as soon as she can so they can be a family again. Bethany and Parker also discuss Hannah’s pregnancy. It seems Hannah has followed in Bethany’s footsteps in that department.

Who Should Have Custody of a Child? Conner and Skye

Not far across the state line Melodie, a widowed lawyer with one child, Zoe, is looking for a job because she is beginning to hurt financially. Although she has experience with a prominent law firm, her interviewers don’t take her seriously because she is a devoted mother. They are afraid that will detract from her work. She leaves her latest interview discouraged, knowing they will not hire her.

When she returns home, she sees her new neighbor. He had seen her demolish her front door in the morning before she left for her interview. She notices he has replaced her door for her.

Instead of being grateful, she is furious, since she doesn’t want anyone to think she is dependent on a man’s help. The neighbor, Conner Walker, and his daughter Bella, had just moved into the house he’d inherited from his grandfather. He doesn’t think much of lawyers. He does, however, love his daughter, very much.

Melodie pays Conner a visit to chew him out for replacing her door, but he makes peace with her and the two become friends. As it turns out, their daughters also become friends. Their teacher had told them they are twins because they share a birthday.

Conner is upset because he realizes his wife Gola has hired a private investigator to track him down. He and Bella have kept moving so that it would be hard to locate them. As the reader has already guessed, Bella is really Skye, Willow’s half-sister. Conner, too, has heard about Gola’s upcoming parole hearing and he is determined to keep Skye.

Book Review: A Mother's Conviction by Karen Lenfestey
Photo by Chris Yarzab, CC 2.0

Neither Bethany nor Conner believes that Gola is ready to be a good mother. She had neglected the girls and often left them alone for more than a day with no food, while she partied.

She finally had hit another car while driving drunk, and two people died. That’s why she was in prison. No one had expected her to survive the accident herself, and that is why Conner took Skye. Gola claims Conner kidnapped Skye.

My Response to A Mother’s Conviction

This book hit me close to home, since I was once a foster parent. So was my next door neighbor. Both of us were in fost-adopt programs, hoping to adopt children we were fostering.

I remember taking long walks with my neighbor as we shared our concerns and our fears that something might interfere with the adoptions. Her foster child was a drug baby, born addicted. Our children’s mother  abandoned them when their father went to prison. He was the only one contacting them.

Their mother didn’t want them back, but she had promised our daughter she would come get them. She would promise to call at a certain time, Sarah would wait by the phone, and the calls never came. I learned this from Sarah’s previous foster mom. Nevertheless, Sarah kept hoping.

Our daughter still dreamed of being reunited with her birth mother. Our son didn’t even remember her. Even though the children had been neglected and had experienced much of what Willow and Skye had experienced, my Sarah still wanted her real mother, just as Willow did. She had been nine, older than Willow, when she came to live with us.

Book Review: A Mother's Conviction by Karen Lenfestey
Our daughter Sarah when she was still our foster child. © B. Radisavljevic

Unlike Conner, our only custody battles had been with the county, but we know the fear that comes when you think someone will take your child from you. Karen Lenfestey captured that fear very accurately. She also portrayed pretty accurately how torn the children in foster care can feel.

When foster parents have truly loved them, the children know it. They don’t really want to leave foster parents who have given them love, stability, and a home where they have made new friends. If they feel settled into a neighborhood and adjusted to a new school, they don’t want leave. Yet there is still a pull to go “home.” Sometimes they don’t realize that going “home” will mean a separation from a foster parent they’re bonding with.

Is A Mother’s Conviction for You?

 

A Mother’s Conviction is the third book in the Secrets Series by Karen Lenfestey. You can  get all three books at once to see what happened to Bethany before she took in Willow.

 Secrets Series (3 Book Series)

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Foster parents and children, single parents, young widows, or anyone who loves children won’t want to miss this book. There is an “R” rated scene, but it fits the context and relationship. This book has a subtle message for pregnant teens and their families, as well. The characters are well-developed and likable. You may find your sympathies going to all of them.

I will not tell you how the book turns out because I don’t want to spoil it for you. I hope you will read it because it deals with many issues relevant to today’s families

Book Review: A Mother's Conviction by Karen Lenfestey

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Book Review of Wish Come True by Eileen Goudge

The Family Dynamics

Wish Come True by Eileen Goudge deals with a dysfunctional family, and specifically the relationship between three sisters and their mother. During the book we learn that the oldest sister, Monica, a famous actress now in wheelchair,  had been sexually abused by her father while a child. Her mother Betty, a battered wife had known, but not stopped it.

 

Book Review of Wish Come True by Eileen Goudge
License CCO, https://pixabay.com/en/dependent-dementia-woman-old-age-441406/

Anna, who is in the process of losing the pounds that have always made her feel ugly in comparison to her gorgeous sister, cares for Monica by day and their mother Betty by night. Monica pays Anna very little but makes heavy demands on her time and energy. Anna puts up with it because it’s the only way she can afford to pay for help in caring for Betty, who has dementia and can’t be left alone. Anna would love to be free to live her own life again, but in spite of Edna’s urging, Anna simply hasn’t the heart to put her mother in a nursing home. 

Anna pays Edna to help Betty in the daytime, but Monica’s money makes that possible . Arcela is paid to help Monica during the night when Anna can’t be with her. The third sister, Liz, does very little to help Anna with Monica or her mother. She is divorced and has a child.

Anna resents having Monica dominate her life while constantly putting her down, especially about her plump figure and unstylish clothes. As the book unfolds you soon understand as you watch Anna and Monica interact what a toxic situation Anna is in.

 

The Intervention

Book Review of Wish Come True by Eileen Goudge
Public Domain courtesty of Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/en/drink-glass-alcohol-beverage-1031701/

Monica is an alcoholic.  When Anna can no longer face dealing with the drunken Monica, she finally persuades a reluctant Liz  join her for an intervention to insist Monica enter a live-in rehab program.

Liz resists but finally agrees, and she and Anna participate in group therapy during family week as part of the treatment plan. In the therapy process Anna and Liz learn much more about each other and begin to build a better relationship.  Anna also falls in love with Marc, one of the therapists there. He reveals he has a wife he still loves who is in a mental institution.

Murder?

After Monica comes home from rehab, she seems to be abstaining for a while, but then starts drinking again. After a confrontation where Anna hands in her resignation, she returns home exhausted physically and mentally and goes to bed early.  It is  Arcela’s night off, so Monica is alone. The next morning when Arcela arrives at  work, Monica is found dead in her swimming pool. Anna is arrested for her murder. As they say, no good deed goes unpunished.

Ironically, just as it appears Anna might finally find happiness, it seems she may have to spend the rest of her life in prison. You’ll have to read the book to see what happens next — to Anna, to Liz, to Mark,  to Betty and to all the characters in the subplots I didn’t introduce.

My Response to the Book and Recommendation

This book held my interest from beginning to end. I so wanted to see Anna stand up to Monica, who uses every bit of her acting talent to continue to manipulate Anna and keep her from having a satisfying life. Anyone who has ever lived with or had an alcoholic in the family can relate to Anna’s discouragement and frustration.  The romance with Marc,  Anna’s arrest, their search for the real killer, and watching the murder hearing made it hard for me to put the book down until everything was resolved.

I would  recommend this book to anyone who has suffered at the hands of alcoholics or been abused as a child or by a husband or boyfriend.  Friends and those trying to help such people will also find this book meaningful. Even if you’ve led a fairly normal life, you will find it easy to become emotionally involved with the well-developed characters in the book and enter into their lives.


After reading Wish Come True, I’d like to go back  and read the other books in the Carson Springs Series . Although Wish Come True can easily stand alone, I wish I’d read the two earlier books in the series first. I just stumbled upon this book, but you can start at the beginning. You can also save by buying all three books at once for your Kindle. I have a Kindle Paperwhite, which I reviewed in Should You Buy a Kindle Paperwhite? 

I also reviewed The Replacment Wife by Eileen Goudge – another book you might enjoy.